Immigrants Still Build Empires

Random thought: Is the Woke crowd underestimating the intelligence of immigrants unwittingly or purposefully to fulfill some agenda?

Actions that should bring this question to mind are not new. All children up to their late teen years have quick little brains that learn languages adequately when plunged into a new language environment, yet “bilingual education” treats them like slow learners sometimes for years. Politicians and the media lump immigrants into the category of “people of color,” and relegate that group to the helpless people pile. Progressives express astonishment when naturalized Latino citizens vote for non-progressive candidates (as so many voted for Donald Trump) thereby ignoring the progressive mandate.

Immigrants have gone from being viewed as the builders of America, the captains of industry and culture to being the victims of “white supremacy.” Are our children learning about Andrew Carnegie and Isabel Allende? How about Sandra Cisneros and her classic The House on Mango Street?

One of the most important themes of The House on Mango Street is the power of words. Esperanza first learns that the lack of language (especially English) means powerlessness, as with Mamacita, who is trapped in her apartment by her ignorance and fear of English. This leads to Esperanza understanding the power of controlling language, which first comes through the idea of names. Litcharts – The House on Mango Street

Words and language are immensely powerful tools. Control language, control our personal destiny. Control language, control the populace. Repeat enough times words like “white supremacy,” and even putdowns sound like fighting words for equity and justice:

We are prioritizing antiracist arts instruction in our work,” department director Sam Bass told ABC7. “The use of so many acronyms within the educational field often tends to alienate those who may not speak English to understand the acronym. Newsweek, 02/02/21

And not capable to inquire, find out, get acquainted with an acronym?

In Rules for Radicals, Saul Alinsky’s manual for radical change, he says,

The general idea here is that purity about tactics is a luxury that only the already powerful can afford; that doesn’t mean anything goes, but it does mean that the undesirability of a particular means has to be weighed against the gravity of the injustice being fought.

The organizers first job is to create the issues or problems, and organizations must be based on many issues. The organizer must first rub raw the resentments of the people of the community; fan the latent hostilities of many of the people to the point of overt expression. He must search out controversy and issues, rather than avoid them, for unless there is controversy people are not concerned enough to act. . . . An organizer must stir up dissatisfaction and discontent.

If erasing the past, creating issues, and cornering as many groups as possible into a corner of helplessness furthers a cause, so be it.

Pictured: Beto Perez (standing), immigrant from Colombia and founder of the enormously successful Zumba aerobics routines.